imitate

im|i|tate [ˈımıteıt] v [T]
[Date: 1500-1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of imitari]
1.) to copy the way someone behaves, speaks, moves etc, especially in order to make people laugh
She was a splendid mimic and loved to imitate Winston Churchill.
2.) to copy something because you think it is good
vegetarian products which imitate meat
The Japanese have no wish to imitate Western social customs and attitudes.
>imitator n
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HINT sense 1
Do not use imitate when you mean to do the same thing as someone else. Use copy instead: She worries that Tom will copy his brother and leave home (NOT She worries that he will imitate his brother).
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Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Imitate — Im i*tate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Imitated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Imitating}.] [L. imitatus, p. p. of imitari to imitate; of unknown origin. Cf. {Image}.] 1. To follow as a pattern, model, or example; to copy or strive to copy, in acts, manners etc.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • imitate — [im′i tāt΄] vt. imitated, imitating [< L imitatus, pp. of imitari, to imitate, akin to aemulus: see EMULATE] 1. to seek to follow the example of; take as one s model or pattern 2. to act the same as; impersonate; mimic 3. to reproduce in form …   English World dictionary

  • imitate — ► VERB 1) follow as a model. 2) copy (a person s speech or mannerisms), especially for comic effect. 3) reproduce; simulate: synthetic fabrics that imitate silk. DERIVATIVES imitable adjective imitator noun. ORIGIN Latin imitari, related to …   English terms dictionary

  • imitate — I verb adopt, caricature, copy, counterfeit, duplicate, echo, emulate, fabricate, fake, follow suit, forge, impersonate, match, mimic, mirror, parallel, parody, parrot, plagiarize, portray, pose, pretend, reflect, repeat, represent, reproduce,… …   Law dictionary

  • imitate — (v.) 1530s, a back formation from IMITATION (Cf. imitation) or imitator, or else from L. imitatus. Related: Imitated; imitating. An Old English word for this was æfterhyrigan …   Etymology dictionary

  • imitate — *copy, mimic, ape, mock Analogous words: impersonate (see ACT vb): simulate, feign, counterfeit (see ASSUME): caricature, burlesque, parody, travesty (see under CARICATURE n) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • imitate — has a derivative form imitable meaning ‘able to be imitated’ …   Modern English usage

  • imitate — [v] pretend to be; do an impression of act like, affect, ape, assume, be like, borrow, burlesque, carbon*, caricature, clone, copy, counterfeit, ditto*, do like*, do likewise, duplicate, echo, emulate, falsify, feign, follow, follow in footsteps* …   New thesaurus

  • imitate — 01. My friend can [imitate] the teacher s voice so well that if you don t see him when he s doing it, you think it is her. 02. There is an expression that says that [imitation] is the sincerest form of flattery. 03. Francois de La Rouchefoucauld… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • imitate — imitator, n. /im i tayt /, v.t., imitated, imitating. 1. to follow or endeavor to follow as a model or example: to imitate an author s style; to imitate an older brother. 2. to mimic; impersonate: The students imitated the teacher behind her back …   Universalium

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